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Authored by Edward Mossman

How to write a Descriptive Essay - Guide 2021

 

There are three main categories of descriptive essays by a essay writer. First is a “narrative description” that describes the plot or development of an event in chronological order. The second category is a “scene”, which elaborates on either one scene (as if it were filmed) or several scenes from a story, book, movie, etc., describing them in detail and emphasizing their importance as events in the tale or as individual parts. The third type of descriptive essay is used to help understand something better in terms of what it means rather than how it happened. These essays can cover much more ground but still focus on the most important details…




It all depends on the question you're answering: "What's this thing like and how does it work?" Where do I have to look for details? How many examples can I give, and are they necessary?




 

 

 

Imagine the following situation: You're assigned to write a descriptive essay about a certain object. The teacher's guidelines or requirements may be different from school to school. Some teachers will require you to use all five senses, while others will specify that you only use three or four. Some want you to describe the setting, some don’t care at all where you set your story. They just want an example of what you mean by “descriptive”. Whether the assignment is long or short, specific or very open-ended, there are two basic ways of going about it:




essay writer sevice will take a look at the more free-flowing approach first. What you have to do is figure out what you really want to say about this “thing” we're talking about and decide how best to get that message across. Since it's an essay, it has to be written in English words. And like all good stories, there has to be some kind of plot or development within your story, something that keeps the reader involved and interested in your account:




The thing I'm describing:




A picture my sister painted after a trip she took for Thanksgiving with her husband last year. I hung it on the wall above my desk; I can't help but look at it every time I go into the room.




The first thing I notice about it is the amount of detail. There are four individual objects that make up this painting, all realistically drawn and in a natural setting: a green vase with flowers inside, two glasses with liquid in them on its sides and what looks like an old-fashioned camera lying on top of a tablecloth on one end. In addition to these things there's also some kind of wooden object resting against the lower left corner of the canvas (I think it might be a desk). The artist then has clearly painted himself – my sister had never drawn herself before – standing in front of this scene, looking at me as if asking: “Do you recognize any of these items?”




The only thing about this painting I don't fully understand, even though I've been looking at it for a year now, is the fact that her husband's face turns into this facial expression I can only describe as “evil”. The man in the picture seems to be laughing or grimacing (I can never tell which). To me, he looks both drunk and happy while leaning toward his wife with a smile on his face, but there’s something just out of frame that makes him look really creepy…




Now comes the second step: figuring out how to write about what you have seen. If you're writing about a scene from your story/movie/dream:




 Students often find it difficult to write descriptive essays. With this essay writer free online guide, we hope you will be able to create a successful essay that captivates your reader and conveys the beauty of your subject in an engaging way. Remember, all writing is about telling a story. So think about how you would tell someone else what you see or feel if they were standing next to you when looking at something beautiful like scenery from afar or inside an art museum.

 

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